The Historic Porsche 962 Collection

The Porsche 956/962 is the most successful sports racing car in history and the 962 is considerably rarer and user friendly than many realise.

The 962 Collection

The Porsche 956/962 is the most successful sports racing car in history and the 962 is considerably rarer and user friendly than many realise.

  • Porsche 962-004 Works

    One of three Rothmans-backed works cars, this was the number one car driven by Jackie Ickx (who won Le Mans six times), in his final year before retirement and Jochen Mass. Went on to take pole position in 1986 Le Mans 24hrs.

  • Porsche 962-007 Works

    One of just two new lightweight Rothmans works car built for 1987, and updated to 1988 Shell Dunlop spec for 1988 Le Mans.

  • Porsche 962-008 Works

    Last works Rothmans Porsche built, ran as Number 17 driven by Derek Bell and Hans Stuck and finished on the podium in every race entered. Wearing its Shell-Dunlop livery, this was driven by the Andretti trio in the 1988 Le Mans 24hrs 

  • Porsche 962-010 Works

    The last works factory car, built specifically to win the 1988 Le Mans 24 hours. Pole, Fastest lap, 2nd O/A

  • Porsche 962-011 Works

    The last 962 to win a world championship round. Updated in 1993 to ultimate development of the 962.

  • Porsche 962-003BM

    Chassis 962-003BM raced new in several of the most iconic and stunning liveries, actually achieving the last 2nd place in a world championship round for the 962, against very strong opposition.

  • Porsche 962-201

    A sister car for 962/200 and also with a Nigel Stroud tub, it’s debut race was at Le Mans, in black Raika colours in 1989 with David Hobbs, Steven Andskar and future Formula One world champion Damon Hill in his one and only outing at La Sarthe. 

  • Porsche 962-108

    Universally acknowledged as the world’s fastest 962 in period, the Miller car is certainly one of the most iconic and instantly recognisable liveries.

    The 1989 Daytona 24 hrs overall winner and 2nd in 1988 - starting from pole.

There were 10 works team chassis numbers, '001' was built for IMSA, and is in the factory museum. 002 / 003 / 004 were the 1985 and 86 Rothmans world championship team cars 005 was a sprint car, only raced once as a Rothmans car. '006' is in the factory museum. 007 and 008 were the new lightweight Rothmans cars for '87 and raced until after Le Mans (007 was crashed prior to LM '87) '009' was the replacement Supercup car for the crashed 005. 010 was the last works car built - specifically to win the 1988 Le Mans 24 hrs. After withdrawing as a factory race team in 1988, Porsche built 6 further factory numbered chassis for the works supported Joest team, numbered '011' to '016'

After the works withdrew in 1988, the privateer teams needed to carry on their own development to stay competitive with the Jaguars and Sauber Mercedes.

Both BRUN and Richard LLOYD led the way by redesigning the chassis, both using part carbon and honeycomb, with aero similar to the Jaguars/Saubers with short tail and separate wings At Le Mans BRUN surprised all in 1990, when their standard factory chassis REPSOL car ran with the Jaguar and Nissan throughout the race - losing 2nd place with just 15 mins to go.